Recently, one of the country’s most notorious white collar criminals, Bernie Madoff, 82, petitioned the court to give him a compassionate release from his 150-year sentence because he is terminally ill from end-stage kidney disease.

However, the judge in Madoff’s federal case denied the prisoner’s request, calling his crimes “one of the most egregious financial crimes of all time,” and that “many people are still suffering from” the damage that Madoff wreaked.

Madoff’s attorney revealed that their final hope was that President Trump would commute his sentence.

In 2009, Madoff pleaded guilty to what was the biggest Ponzi scheme ever perpetrated. He has served the past 11 years in North Carolina at a federal medical facility.

His crimes resulted in the massive swindle of investors in Madoff’s firm. His victims lost billions of dollars in Madoff’s Ponzi scheme.

The judge said in his ruling that he was not convinced that “Mr. Madoff was . . . truly remorseful” for the fraud that spanned decades. Barring intervention from the President, Bernie Madoff is going to die in prison.

White collar crime may not involve violence, but it can destroy lives just the same. That’s why the courts take such a hard stance at those accused of perpetrating it.

If, like Madoff, you were arrested for a white collar crime, you must have a firm defense strategy if you intend to fight the charges in court. In some cases, however, it may indeed be in your best interest to accept a plea bargain should one be offered to you.

By working closely with your criminal defense attorney, you can make the best decision for your particular case.

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